EEOC Believes Sexual Harassment Prevention Efforts Are Failing

by Carney Shegerian* The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently released a report revealing the inadequacy of employers’ efforts to prevent sexual harassment. The EEOC said in a statement that employer training, which has been used for over 30 years, “has been ineffective and focused on simply avoiding legal liability,” rather than preventing harassment from…

A Tribute To Our Living Constitution

By Isaac Saidel-Goley* In honor of Constitution Day, I reflect on what I have learned from countless pages of constitutional law cascading from a brief document that I have had the privilege to spend the past few years of my life studying. I have learned that the Constitution is not, and has never been, perfect….

On Racial Bias and Police Shootings

By Simon Hedlin* More than a hundred blacks have been shot and killed by the police this year. According to data compiled by The Washington Post, nearly 600 individuals have died in police shootings in 2016. About half of those killed were ethnic minorities, and blacks were more than twice as likely to be fatally…

  The Harvard Law and Policy Review is excited to announce the release of Volume 10.2! Volume 10.2 explores cutting edge policymaking at the state level—examining meaningful changes, setbacks, and lessons learned—as well as the legal questions surrounding state innovation. It also includes articles by Catherine MacKinnon, Brishen Rogers and others on important, topical legal and…

The Goals of Good Process: Lessons from Mass Claims

By Benjamin Rajotte and Vikram J. Kapoor* Imagine that you were hurt by something beyond your control. Maybe a faulty product, or a commercial plane crash. Something big and painful to us and many other people. Amidst the emotional turmoil, we might be fairly motivated to recover for our losses. But what if we could…

The Highest Pharmaceutical Companies in the Land: The Legal Ramifications of Private Sector Objections to the Death Penalty

By Rose Carmen Goldberg* “Welcome to Groundhog Day,” as former Justice Scalia once said. The scene is familiar. This month, yet another pharmaceutical company has voiced opposition to use of its drugs in executions. In a public statement, pharmaceutical juggernaut Pfizer announced it will not supply drugs for lethal injections, and will enforce strict distribution…

Let’s Force Religious Hypocrisy Out of the Closet

By Ana Choi* In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision legalizing same-sex marriage in Obergefell v. Hodges last summer, many conservative states have begun to pass legislative measures trying to stem the progress made by the LGBTQ community. North Carolina passed a law prohibiting transgender individuals from using bathrooms that do not match the…

When Zero Means Some, Confusion Reigns

By Lisa Heinzerling* As I have argued elsewhere, the transparency achieved by federal laws relating to food is only partial, and sometimes only serves to conceal a lie. If one wanted to see this principle in operation, one might turn to a recent federal district court decision from California. In Backus v. Nestlé, the court…

Call for Submissions

Calling all progressive thinkers, practitioners, academics, and authors! Harvard Law & Policy Review (HLPR), the official journal of ACS, is accepting 10,000-15,000 word submissions for publication as part of our symposiums on the following topics: Beyond the War on Drugs: Privacy, Prescription, and Punishment America in Debt: Borrowers, Creditors, and Forgiveness in the Age of Austerity Every issue…

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