Monthly Archives: February 2011

Expecting the Unreasonable

HLPR Online editorial staff Introduction Persons with disabilities can pose complex challenges to law enforcement officers charged with keeping the peace. Police officers are often the first responders to persons with mental disabilities in crisis.[1] These problematic, high-stakes encounters have drastically increased in frequency as a result of the gradual shift from institutional to community-based care.[2] The…

Fear The Sockpuppets

Jake Laperruque Growing up in the dawn of the Internet Age, as children we were often told, “don’t trust strangers online,” and frightened with stories of abductors posing as digital friends.  But, while we have always been vigilant of an individual with a misleading online identity, right now we face a new threat with strong…

Food Prices, a Speculator Sport?

Anthony Kammer  Frederick Kaufmann spoke last week at Harvard about his Harper’s Magazine article, The Food Bubble: How Wall Street starved millions and got away with it (pdf here), for an event sponsored by the HLS Food Society. Kaufmann has described, in scrupulous detail, how the creation of the Commodity Index Fundsin 1991 opened the door to speculation in…

Moore’s Law and The Future of Renewable Energy: Part 4

Jason Harrow This is the fourth post in a multi-part series. In Part 1, I described Moore’s Law, which states that computer technology gets twice as good, for the same price, every two years.  In Part 2, I argued that President Obama’s clean energy goals are overly optimistic because energy technologies do not obey Moore’s Law. In Part…

A Response to Harvard’s Career Advice on Wikileaks

HLPR Online editorial staff This post was written by Danny Rosenthal and Rachel Lauter and signed by nine members of the HLPR masthead, incoming masthead, and blog staff.  Their names are listed at the end of the post.  The full response of Alexa Shabecoff, head of the Harvard Law School Office of Public Interest Advising,…

Wisconsin can afford tax cuts, not teachers?

Yevgeny Shrago Ohio and Indiana have followed Wisconsin into the Randian dream of breaking public sector unions by stripping them of dearly bought collective bargaining rights. Although most Americans (when polled by someone other than a Republican quasi-operative like Scott Rasmussen) oppose Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s plan, don’t expect this to be the sort of issue that drives votes…

Financial Crisis Reform: What Does that Mean for You?

Zach Luck Most people never owned a subprime mortgage, many never owned a mortgage, and very few will ever buy a mortgage backed security.  But, look in your wallet and you will nevertheless likely find a complicated credit product:  Your credit card. In 2009, in the wake of the financial crisis, Congress passed significant new…

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