Monthly Archives: June 2011

Tango Down: Lulz Security

Jake Laperruque  This Sunday, the newest star of hacktivism – Lulz Security – announced it would be going into early retirement, and would immediately end its hacking ways.  Although less established than other hacking groups such as Anonymous (LulzSec hasn’t even been hacking for two months), the online organization has already become a world phenomenon through their news…

What New York’s Gay Marriage Law Reveals About American Democracy

Anthony Kammer  On Sunday, the New York Times ran an important piece by Michael Barbaro called “Behind N.Y. Gay Marriage, an Unlikely Mix of Forces.”  Many publications, rightly so, are celebrating New York’s long-overdue passage of same-sex marriage legislation.  But what’s noteworthy about Barbaro’s piece is that it reveals how this bill actually passed NY’s Republican Senate. What it uncovers about…

Kansas attempts to be “abortion-free”

Marshall Thompson  Kansas has a new law that requires its abortion clinics, all three of them, to meet new regulatory standards and apply for annual licenses. The new standards require major renovations to existing clinic buildings that may be impossible to accomplish in time. The broad law gives the state’s secretary of health and environment several different avenues for…

Beware Foreskin Man

Smita Ghosh San Francisco’s proposed circumcision ban has prompted many an either-or question: “Are the Circumcision Opponents Anti-Semitic or Sexually Repressed?,”  asks one commentator, a Californian Rabbi; “Is circumcision insane or healthy?,” wonders another.  San Francisco residents decided in May to put the proposed ban on this November’s ballot — and people are eager to discuss the…

Don’t Dick Around On Twitter

Jake Laperruque  In a recently released piece focusing on New York Congressman Anthony Weiner, the magazine “Moment” wrote: “As part of a promise to his Twitter followers, he recently released a photo of himself . . . .” Any guesses on how that sentence ends?  It’s “…on his big day as an awkward-looking 13-year-old boy, complete…

Pushing Boundaries toward Fairer Redistricting

Anthony Kammer  Following two landmark ballot initiatives, California transferred the power to draw legislative districts from the state legislature to an independent commission. And on June 10, the Citizen Redistricting Commissionunveiled its first proposed maps for CA’s State Assembly, State Senate, and U.S. Congressional seats. By most accounts, California made a massive stride toward improved democratic representation in…

ACS Convention discusses Free Speech on the Roberts Court

Jessica Jackson  Citizens United has clearly become the single most divisive first amendment opinion issued by the Roberts Court.  What’s most interesting about that case and the other campaign finance reform cases that make up  2/3rds of the free-speech cases that have received cert from the Roberts Court, is that they illustrate a dichotomy within the…

HLPR Blog Roundup: Politics as Usual

HLPR Online editorial staff The flavor of the month for our bloggers has been the crumbling state of our nation’s political system.  With no shortage of material on which to blog, our posts have captured various bits of the deterioration. In a piece published in the San Francisco Chronicle,  Jessica Jackson lamented the treatment of progressive professor…

Adventures in Budgetland

Yevgeny Shrago The world’s eighth-largest economy passed its budget on Wednesday. A year after setting the record for budget tardiness, California’s lawmakers took advantage of a voter initiative allowing budgets to pass with a simple majority and sent the budget to Governor Jerry Brown on time for the first time since 1986. A cynic might suggest that the threat of docked…

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