Monthly Archives: October 2011

Occupy Oakland Gets Evicted

Mark Wilson  I’m writing this from Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART), the San Francisco Bay Area subway system. As I write, the Oakland City Center/12th Street station is closed due to a “civil disturbance” arising out of the Occupy Oakland protest. Early Tuesday morning, Oakland police raided Occupy Oakland’s tent city in Frank Ogawa Plaza,…

Anonymous attacks Internet child porn

Marshall Thompson  Anonymous, one of the foremost hacktivist groups around, decided to clean up the Internet a bit last week by attacking websites and servers that either distribute or support the distribution of child porn. The loosely organized group of hackers has always had a soft spot for vulnerable groups of people and a feeling that they…

Occupy Wall Street and Voter Enfranchisement: Possibilities for 2012?

Najah Farley On October 22, 2011, the New York Times published “The Paradox of the New Elite.” In the opinion article, Alexander Stille, a professor of international journalism, discussed the paradox of the fact that as formerly oppressed groups, such as women, blacks and gays, have been accepted into the mainstream, economic inequality has increased. Stille posited…

Ninth Circuit stretches objective reasonableness standard

Jessica Jackson  When Officer Ornelas pulled over Malaika Brooks, seven months pregnant at the time, for speeding in November of 2004, neither of them had any idea that the next hour of their lives would eventually be scrutinized by half the judges of the Ninth Circuit. Ms. Brooks, who denied having sped and believed that Ornelas…

Can (and Should) the Law Compel Compassion?

Sushila Rao  Video footage depicting a two-year old girl in China being run over twice by the same mini-van driver, and then once again by a light truck – while as many as 18 passersby ignored her plight – has sparked off the latest round of moral outcry and introspective reflection on modern societies’ lack…

Qaddafi’s death and the aftermath

Najah Farley Qaddafi’s death yesterday marked a turning point in the Arab Spring. The number of authoritarian regimes in the Arab world continues to dwindle and the number of rulers that have been subject to some type of reckoning (whether legal or justified) has increased. His capture (and the apparently gruesome videos) can only serve…

Democratic Legitimacy Deficits: The European Union and America

Peter Dunne Having completed my primary law degree in Ireland and France, I have spent much of the last five years speaking about “democratic legitimacy deficits” – the perception that the European Union is a fundamentally undemocratic institution, controlled by shadowy bureaucrats in Brussels who have little or no interest in the will of the…

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