Monthly Archives: April 2012

So Your Tweets are no Different Than Bank Records, huh?

By Jonathan Peters Follow me @jonathanwpeters on Twitter. Your tweets are no different from bank records, a New York judge ruled Monday.  Prosecutors had subpoenaed an Occupy protestor’s tweets after he was arrested in the fall during a Brooklyn Bridge protest.  The judge was ruling on the protestor’s motion to quash the subpoena, which sought “user information, including email…

States’ Rights . . . to Do What, Exactly?

By Mark Wilson So we’ve got a federal health care law, the federal government arguing for exclusive federal authority in immigration, and statutes that allow for federal prosecution of basically any crime if that crime involved using the mail or transmitting anything over a wire. Whither federalism?

Death Sentence Overturned Due to Racial Bias

by Billy Corriher Last week, Marcus Robinson was on death row. Now, he has been given a chance at life. His death sentence was overturned because the judge found that black jurors were systematically excluded in his trial. Judge Gregory Weeks issued an order overturning the sentence under North Carolina’s Racial Justice Act, which gives death row inmates the…

Framing Infrastructure Investment

By Tom Watts Elizabeth Warren has, during her Senate campaign, become known as a remarkable communicator.* Last year, one of her speeches went viral for being so clear, so crisp, and so effective an expression of basic progressive values that it had popular appeal immediately. Many on the left have been struggling for a way to articulate the…

Troubling Questions Remain in the Aftermath of Mehanna’s Conviction

By Najah Farley In the wake of Tarek Mehanna’s conviction on April 12, 2012, I think that many progressive attorneys must have considerable questions about prosecutions for aiding and abetting terrorism and freedom of speech. Mehanna was convicted of terrorism charges and sentenced to 17 ½ years in prison. Based on the prosecution’s evidence, Mehanna went to Yemen…

West Virginia Rolls Out Public Financing for Judges

By Billy Corriher After Massey Energy Co. spent enormous sums of money to influence elections for the West Virginia Supreme Court, the state created a pilot public financing program to free judicial candidates from outside influence.  Only one candidate (out of eight) in this year’s election has accepted public funding.  Republican Allen Loughry, a longtime clerk at…

Tax Cheats Deserve Due Process Too

By Yevgeny Shrago The federal highway and transportation reauthorization bill passed by the Senate (which carries the delightfully meaningless title “Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century”) and currently waiting for consideration by the House contains a provision that has a little more to do with due process and taxes than with roads.  According to Section 40304,…

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